Kathryn Winograd

 


Words on Birds and Nietzsche from Phantom Canyon by THE

Despairing of words for love, which Friedrich Nietzsche described as markers for “something already dead in our hearts,” Kathryn Winograd goes searching for images instead.  . .


Jill Christman on "Bathing"from Phantom Canyon

You know how you remember where you were, who you were with, and what you were doing when you listened to such-and-such a song, maybe for the first time? Like Pink Floyd’s “Wish You Were Here” when no doubt you should not have been there, and certainly not with that crowd, under those conditions, in a smoky basement apartment with black lights on Oglethorpe Avenue in Savannah? Right. You do.

This is how it is for me with the first essay I ever heard from what has become Phantom Canyon—“Bathing.”

The Newest from Migrations at 9600 Feet, my year long  series on environmental issues and natural wonders at Beacon, a platform for reader-supported journalism.

from Slow Arrow of Beauty:Neighboring the Wilds

A mushroom, and a neighbor who dams  Eight Mile Creek  for a fishing hole, despite Colorado water laws, force a reconsideration of what beauty  is when the natural world is sub-plotted into 40 acre parcels inhabited by clueless suburban “refugees.”

View more on my Migrations at 9600 feet blog


 
  

















Kathryn Winograd, poet and essayist, is author of Air Into Breath (Ashland Poetry Series), winner of the Colorado Book Award in Poetry and Phantom Canyon: Essays of Reclamation 
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 email: kathywin@earthlink.net or kathryn.winograd@arapahoe.edu.